05
Dec

melted crayon ornaments

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We make a homemade ornament for the tree every single year. It’s just a tradition that we do that I started when my kids were babies. This is our fifth year going strong, and I have to say, these are SOOOO pretty, they might be my favourite so far. I know I say that every year, but these are just so pretty. They’re easy to make, and they look brilliant. All the crayon drippings are INSIDE the ornament too, so there is ZERO mess! I swear you could buy these in fancy stores they’re so pretty! We made 18 of these beauties this past weekend and I already want to make more to give away. They would make a great gift if you can bear to part with any of them. Mine are all on my tree. Every single one of them! This is how you make them…

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What You’ll Need

1 package of Crayola crayons – don’t cheap out here because the Crayola ones really do melt the best
a sharp craft knife
1 package of clear GLASS craft ornaments
a hair dryer
a pair of oven mitts of thick winter gloves

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* My kids had fun picking out the crayon colours and putting the crayon pieces in the ornaments. I did the blow drying part because the glass ornaments can get quite hot! Please supervise children when performing this part of the craft!*

How to Make It

1. Take your crayons out of the box and, using your craft knife, peel the wrappers from the crayons. Once your crayons are peeled, cut your crayons into small pieces – about 6 pieces per crayon.

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2. Take the silver top off your ornament and place 3-4 crayon pieces into the ball. Experiment with colour combinations and have fun!

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3. Put the silver top back on the ornament and put on a thermal or winter mitt. Turn your hair dryer on high heat and hold your ornament in your gloved hand. Heat up the crayons until they start to melt and then swirl the ornament around in your hand so the colours swirl all over the inside of the ornament. Don’t melt the crayons completely, it will be too much. Once you are satisfied with the coverage, turn off the blow dryer heat.

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4. Take the silver top back off the ornament, and turn the ornament upside down over a plate or bowl. Turn your hair dryer on once again and heat up the crayons until they fall out of the opening at the bottom and on to your plate or bowl. Put the silver top back on your ornament, and you’re done!

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Here is a major picture overload of some of my favourite ornaments we made.

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Happy Crafting!

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172 thoughts on “melted crayon ornaments

      1. Jill Post author

        Thanks Karen! I really think glass bulbs need to be used. A previous comment indicated that she used plastic bulbs and the crayon wasn’t sticking to the inside of the plastic bulb.

        Reply
        1. perri

          I have done this with paint, you could use a plastic bulb for that! I do like the crayon idea, but I think plastic and paint would be safer for small children. (I work with toddlers…)

          Reply
          1. Mary Lou

            I’ve done ones with paint but some of them the paint all slid down to one spot. Was strange how the paint looked really pretty but the next day they were ruined. Not sure what happened.

          2. Jill Post author

            I’m not sure what happened Mary Lou as I’ve never done the paint ones before. The paint probably moved around while it was still drying. That’s why these crayon ones are great because the wax dries almost instantly and doesn’t move after that.

          3. nanna

            I love the crayon idea for kids..It’s a kid thing…I don’t think it would be funn with paint and little ones to messy..

      2. Susan

        Good thing I read the comments. Looks like I will have to take back my plastic bulbs at Michael’s and buy glass. Making them for my great nieces and nephews who live in cold WI. My husband and I live in SA, TX so will have to pack them good for shipping.

        Reply
  1. Kate

    Beautiful! Your thoughts on an embossing tool instead of a hair dryer? Just wonder if that would work or be too hot?

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Thanks Kate! I’ve never used an embossing tool, so I’m not sure??? Does it get hotter than a hair dryer? The hair dryer works well because it blows the hot air on the ornament without the hot appliance having to touch the ornament.

      Reply
  2. Ashleigh Hodges

    Hi Jill!
    I just found your blog and Wowza! What a great day to happen upon it! I love these ornaments — they are beautiful. My daughter and I are off to Michael’s to purchase some glass bulbs and use up a basket of broken crayolas! Thanks so much. -Ashleigh

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Oooo, I don’t have the box anymore so I don’t remember the exact size. They had 2 different sizes of clear bulbs there and I got the smaller of the two. They’d be gorgeous any size though. Have fun!

      Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      My kids are 4 and 6 and I had them select the crayon colours for the ornaments and put the crayon pieces inside. I operated the hair dryer and they can help turn the ornament as long as they are wearing oven mitts or thick winter mitts. The bulbs get hot!

      Reply
  3. deanna

    thanks so much for your post! we just made several of them and they turned out beautifully! my daughter had some glitter crayons that she donated to the project and it added a lot of sparkle :-)

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Yay! I’m so glad you loved them. The glitter crayons are a great idea too! I’m usually not a fan of glitter, but the mess would be totally contained in the ornament in this case. That’s awesome!

      Reply
  4. Chris

    I’m doing this with 18 2nd graders next week! I am so excited to send home such a cute little handmade gift for the parents. Thanks for sharing such detailed directions and pictures!!

    Reply
  5. Dianne

    My kids and I just made these for there cousins for Christmas.. We used plastic ornaments cause I didn’t want the glass ones to break.. The plastic ones worked good if you were careful and didn’t hold the heat on it to long or it would melt.. The problem I am having now is the crayon don’t seem to want to stay on the ornament.. I thought about spraying some clear glaze to see if that would work. Any idea on how to make it stay? Thanks

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Hi Dianne! I didn’t have that problem with the glass ornaments so I’m assuming the wax crayons aren’t adhering to the ornaments because they are plastic. I’m really not sure what you could use to get the crayon to stick to the inside because any sprays would be very difficult to get on through the small hole at the top of the ornament. Let me know if you come up with any ideas that may help my other readers who want to use plastic bulbs.

      Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      My hair dryer is 1600 watts. Make sure you are directing the heat exactly where the crayon pieces are inside the ornament. It should really only take 1 minute max before the crayons really start getting melty. Each ornament probably took 2-3 minutes.

      Reply
  6. Dephanie Caldwell

    I made these with my 3 year old grandson to give to his parents as a special gift just from him. He picked out the colors he wanted to do for Mommy & Daddy. He liked them so much he wanted to make one for me & Poppy (my husband). His other set of grandparents , his great grandparents & his uncle. All the people that he thought he would like to give a gift to. I wrote each persons name (what he calls them) & 2013 with a silver glitter pen on them & tied a silver piece of ribbon for hanging. He is so excited he has his own special gift to give everyone.

    Reply
  7. Donna

    You say that you make them every year. Why? Do they last? Does the wax chip off if you hang on to the, from year to year?

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I make homemade ornaments with the kids every year – different ones every year. This is the first time we made these and they should last for years.

      Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I just made them this past Christmas and so far they are great. I can’t really tell you what will happen in the future, but they do seem like they are going to last!

      Reply
  8. Debby S.

    Jill, these are so pretty! Do you think that it would work for plastic ones as well? I work with a special needs girl and I think that she would love to pick out the colors do it. Christmas is right around the corner.

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I’m not too sure these would work well with plastic ornaments because you have to heat the ornaments up to get the crayons to melt. It might not work as well in a plastic ornament. If you try it, let me know.

      Reply
    1. Julie

      I just saw the clear ornaments at Wal-Mart for 99 cents for a box of 6. Can’t do much better than that…they ARE glass and not plastic. Going tomorrow to get a few boxes and try this.

      Reply
  9. Bee

    I absolutely love, love, love these!
    I am a school teacher and want to make these with my class but obviously we can’t use glass in school. Do you think it will still work with plastic baubles? Anyone tried this already?

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Thanks Bee! I haven’t tried this with plastic bulbs, but would be nervous about melting the plastic. If you do try it, please let me know the results. I’m sure you’re not the only one who is wondering! Good luck!

      Reply
  10. Ex2mom

    I just saw this post yesterday. Michaels has the glass ornaments and they are 50% off today (11/10/2014) when I was there. Lots of shapes and sizes packs of 4/6 – 4.99-6.99 orig price. Can’t wait for the kids to get off the bus! We will be giving many of these as gifts – shhhh don’t tell the teachers or bus drivers! ;) Super fun and awesome idea!

    Reply
  11. jen

    hello :) very cute idea! just wondering if you’ve looked at the ornaments this year to see how they’ve held up over a year’s time. thank you!

    Reply
  12. Bonnie G.

    One if my nieces has 7 little ones. Will be sending this on to her for crafts day she she does home schooling. THANK YOU THIS IS GREAT. BTY it will work into my own crafting as well.

    Reply
  13. Nicola

    I’m from Australia where summer is very hot. Any idea if the crayon would stay put, or would we wind up with a puddle of colour in the bottom of the ornament?

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I think as long as it’s not hot enough to actually re-melt the crayons, you should be fine. Will these be kept inside the house? If so, they should be okay.

      Reply
      1. Sharon

        If your crayons aren’t melting in the box they won’t melt in the ornament on a hot day. Keep them out of the sun. They only melt from the heat of the hair dryer. I agree about using Crayola. You want crayons with a high color content. Many bargain ones contain more wax. (comment from retired art teacher)

        Reply
      1. Jill Post author

        Lol! Well I live in Canada and we’re pretty frosty up here for half the year. I store mine in our storage room in my basement. I’m pretty sure they stay cool down there.

        Reply
  14. Tina Jones

    That’s neat! I use craft paints inside the ornaments for 3 years now with 5th graders. This may the next project! I add glitters inside….

    Reply
  15. Lisa B

    For those that want to use plastic bulbs…I made similar ornaments with my children 3 years ago. We used the plastic bulbs and paint. We squirted a small amount of paint inside the bulbs, put the tops back on and swirled it around to coat most of the inside. We took the tops off and let them dry upside down in empty egg cartons for 30 minutes. Then we put a second color in the bulb and swirled until it was completely covered. Once again letting them dry upside down. We didn’t wait for the first color to be completely dry because we want the colors to mix a little so that we ended up with 3 colors in the ornament.

    Reply
  16. stacy bazemore

    my glass ornaments keep cracking and the crayones are not melting well..ive ruined 4 bulbs already …please advise

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I’m sorry to hear that Stacy! Are you using Crayola crayons? It really does make a difference because other brands won’t melt as well and you may have to leave the heat on longer. The Crayola crayons should start melting almost immediately.

      Reply
  17. Tina B

    OMG!!! I love this idea. I’m going to try it. I was thinking I would love to have some type of sparkle to it. Do u think sparkle crayons would work or should I maybe try just sprinkling sparkles on the inside and shaking around when somewhat wet and see how that works. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thank you for sharing this.

    Reply
  18. Catherine

    Hi. From the looks of the replies this was done a year ago. My question is how did the ornaments hold up in storage over the summer? I store mine in the attic or the garage (both of which get hot). I would hate to make these and next year have a puddle of crayon when unpacking them next season. :(

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Mine held up wonderful but they are stored in a cool, dry place. As long as it doesn’t get hot enough to melt actual crayons, they should hold up fine.

      Reply
  19. Audra

    I’m doing this with my 3rd graders to decorate our class tree and then they’ll have an ornament to take home. :) Thanks for the idea!

    Reply
  20. Darlene Gorman

    Is there some trick to getting the crayons out? I’m having trouble getting them out. Melted wax just drips out but no crayon.

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Turn the ornament upside down with the cap off and heat the ornament up with the blowdryer where the crayons are inside. The crayon pieces should fall right out.

      Reply
  21. Heather

    These remind me of some funky ornaments I had in the 80′s, but mine had a little garland puff/pom pom inside it. That would be easy to make and put in there (after the wax cools) for extra fun!

    Reply
  22. Colleen

    I tried these yesterday, while they turned out nice, I would not allow kids to do these at all as the balls get very hot and I was wearing two thick gloves and got burned. We used crayola crayons and another brand, melted the same rate, but the ornament gets too hot for children to do this.

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I’m glad you like them Colleen. Yes, the ornaments do get very hot. That is why I have a disclaimer in bold letters in the post saying that I did this part of the craft for my kids because they get so hot. I really do hope that people see and read that part.

      Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Hmmm. I don’t know. I’ve made dozens of these and haven’t had one single ornament break. Is she using Crayola crayons? They melt best so you don’t have to hold the heat on the ornament for as long.

      Reply
  23. Betsy

    You could also do these in favorite college or team colors and give as gifts to the sports fans in your life!! Great idea. Thanks for posting.

    Reply
  24. Nik

    I am trying to do this as a gift to my family, but I am having issues. I get the Crayola crayons melted in the bottom, but when I try to swirl them, they don’t want to swirl. They get stuck. I try to heat them up again, and then they make large pools in spots then the colors mix, making it brown. Any ideas of how to swirl correctly? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I start swirling the ornaments right when the crayon just begins to melt. I don’t wait until the crayon is all melted at the bottom. I hope that helps!

      Reply
  25. Mike

    I made lots of these with my niece. We used all types of crayons (neon, glitter, metallic) we didn’t limit ourselves to just crayola. I think the problem people were having with ornaments breaking is that the crayons were not cut small enough. I used a little larger than rice size pieces. It melts faster. Too bad I can’t post the pictures.
    Oh.. I also added colored sand to some and it gave it texture and speckled effect. Try shaking the ornaments lightly once the wax melts. It gives a cool effect. Just don’t shake too hard otherwise the crayon may break the glass if it’s not fully melted.

    Reply
  26. Ally

    Everyone should probably think about how they will store these beauties. I know my attic gets so hot in the summer that the wax will melt again and there will be a puddle design when I go to use them next year-not so pretty! Think candlesticks when you store them so you’re not disappointed next year!

    Reply
  27. Karen

    I made these with my kids today and we had a great time making them. They turned out beautiful and we even had glitter glue where we made designs on the outside of the bulbs too – like their name or favorite team, etc.

    Great and easy craft! I found my glass bulbs at Meijers 50% off last week. I did my 7 year old daughter’s for her but my boys – ages 10 and 13 put some thin gloves on and did fine. We placed towels out on the table too and a plate for the wax to drip out on at the end to get the pieces out.

    Have fun! I LOVE this idea!

    My son put about 4 colors in and his turned out awesome. Just be careful not to blend them too much or you may lose the brightness of each color.

    Karen
    Cincinnati

    Reply
  28. Nancy

    I just made 16 ornaments with the grandkids. They turned out great! I had them choose colors and put the crayons in the glass balls and I melted with the hair dryer. We experimented & the smaller pieces of crayon worked better. They plan on giving them as Christmas gifts to family & teachers.

    Reply
  29. Lori Bean

    I just did a trial run with this with my 8 year old daughter, prior to our Brownie meeting. Everything worked great. My one recommendation would be to use even smaller pieces of crayon. We ended up cutting the 6th’s in two. The smaller pieces melt faster, kept her attention (It was a little boring waiting for the crayons to melt) and there weren’t any “remains” to take out.

    I should also add that I am HORRIBLE at doing crafts- my Pinterest attempts are hilariously funny. I was VERY excited that this worked so well.

    As for the people asking about using plastic ornaments, you have to get the ornament fairly hot to melt the crayon and my guess is, it would also melt the plastic (probably faster than the crayons).

    Reply
  30. Dottie

    We made these with our 2 of our granddaughters last night, ages 7 and 9. The 9 year old them, and is going to give them as teacher gifts. My hubby is always looking to make things more efficient. He took a pair of needle nose pliers and put a large rubber band around the handles so it was tight. Then we put the end of the ornament in the needle nose portion and it clamped down on them so it wouldn’t drop and it did not get hot. Worked great for the granddaughters.
    I love these ornaments, they are practically fail proof.

    Reply
  31. Rebeccah

    Made these this afternoon with my two 11 year old daughters and 8 year old son. We had fun and they turned out great! We used crayola regular, glitter crayons and neon crayons. My husband held the hair dryer and we found that it worked best if he held it pointing straight up while the other person (wearing two pairs of gloves) held the ornament over the heat and turned. We found smaller pieces worked best, just 2/3 small pieces. We let them melt a little then started turning. I bought some thin silver and gold ribbon and tied bows around then. The kids also wrote on them with black sharpie. I want to get some gold and silver pens for writing on them, that will look nice. We are going to keep some and give some as teacher and family gifts. We made 17 (and broke two) and I want to make more! Oh we also laid a thick bath mat on the table underneath as padding as it’s easy to slip and drop the ornament when you are wearing two layers of gloves. But really, overall very easy and fun. Thanks for the great idea!

    Reply
  32. Jody

    Hello! I love the idea of these ornaments. But do you have any great ideas for getting these ornaments home without breaking? I’ve done handprint ornaments before, we wrapped them in tissue and then put inside a festive cup to take home and give as gifts. However, I had some very sad kiddos because their ornaments broke on the school bus ride home (I teach Kdg). I’d love to hear how to get them home safely!
    Thanks in advance for any ideas.
    Jody

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Oh boy! I would have thought the tissue paper and cup would have worked. I always wrap mine in tissue paper. Do you have a Christmas party at school where the parents come and celebrate with the kids? My kids did in kindergarten. Maybe they could be given out then so the parents could safely bring them home? I do have other ideas, but none of them would come without incurring extra costs to you by having to buy extra materials….

      Reply
  33. Kelly

    ABSOLUTELY LOVE these!!! I have an annual “Ornament Exchange” this weekend and guess what ornament will be going with me?? Thanks so much for the share!!

    Reply
  34. Kim

    What if you used a crayon sharpener and then used the shavings inside the ornament? I bet the shavings would melt even faster and still produce a beautiful color inside… just a thought for the little ones who have a very short attention span :) and maybe then you could use the plastic ornaments since the shavings would melt faster? Wish my kids were still little, but my “baby” is almost 17 yrs old…

    Happy Crafting everyone :)

    Reply
  35. Mary Jo

    Got a fantastic price for 6pk of the balls at Michaels:$1.79. Didn’t “feel the love” with this craft tho. I couldn’t hold the ball at all with my oven mitt so I switched to a dish towel. I cut the 6th I to 12′s but couldn’t roll the ball around nicely to spread the crayon out. My first one with three colors ended up all muddy. The second was better. I tried to use a long tweezer for better grip but that did not help either. I think I’ll go back to using my stamp pad re-inkers and glitter.

    Reply
  36. Ashley ~ 3 Little Greenwoods

    Oh my goodness these kid friendly ornaments are gorgeous! I love that they are so simple to make. Adding this craft to our Christmas Countdown Activities!

    I would LOVE for you to share this craft at my Show Me Saturday linky party this weekend! We go live each Saturday at 7:00am EST. My readers would love these!
    ~ Ashley

    Reply
  37. Kathy @ Merriment Design

    I craft failed pretty hard on these today. At first it was working but I couldn’t get the crayons to come out once I liked the design and then they melted too much and the the whole thing turned an icky shade of purple. I went through 3 balls and the same (although one turned out almost all orange and kind of cute). How long did you swirl before stopping, and can you be more specific about how to get the pieces out? Have you tried it with shavings and is it easier? I’m skittish now with only 3 balls left! Thanks!!

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Sorry it didn’t turn out better for you, Kathy. I only swirled the crayons around a few times in the ball before I stopped. Really not much at all. Then I turned the ornament upside down and blasted the hairdryer where the crayon piece was in the ornament. It would start to melt and slide right out of the opening at the bottom. Repeat for the other crayon pieces. I hope you have better luck if you try again.

      Reply
  38. Emily

    I also had trouble with this. I think my hair dryer isn’t powerful enough. It took much longer than a minute to get the crayons to melt, and I couldn’t get them to stay melted long enough for satisfactory swirls (even when continually applying heat from the dryer). We gave up and switched to acrylic paint.

    Reply
  39. Cathy

    I love these! I don’t have kids, and i’m going to try these for myself! I may even be moved to give these as gifts to co-workers. Maybe. :)

    Reply
  40. Tracy

    I made these today & I had trouble with them. When the crayons started to melt, I tried to swirl, but the pieces would get stuck on the sides. The crayons just wouldn’t swirl around. I tried shaking, but the pattern was not attractive that way. So, I would heat the pieces again, swirl, heat, etc., but the crayons did not make a smooth design all over this way. When I tried to melt them longer, the colors would drip & blend together. In the process of trying to get crayon evenly dispersed, not completely covering though, the overall heat just melted everything together. The colors blended – the individual colors did not stay separate like yours. I did 12 of them & still couldn’t achieve the look you got. They look like they’ve been tie-dyed. Pretty cool, if that’s the desired effect, but I wanted to keep the individual colors visible though. I used crayola crayons. Maybe I need to watch a video to see it done to figure out why I can’t get mine right!

    Reply
  41. Tabitha

    I have a quick question Jill….
    How long did it take to make the crayon ornaments? I really want to make them for a class, but I don’t want to take up too much class time to do this project.

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      Sorry I didn’t get back to you sooner, Tabitha! The holidays were super busy!! The most time consuming part of this craft is peeling and slicing the crayons. Melting is quick. I hope that helps!

      Reply
  42. Eileen

    I tried doing these 2x with my kids with crayol crayons and clear glass ornaments and each time the ornaments cracked while heating them with the blow dryer. Any
    Tips??

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I’m sorry Eileen! Do you have a super high-powered blow dryer? Were your crayon pieces cut small enough? That’s all I can think of. So sorry!

      Reply
  43. Sarah H

    My daughter is home sick today missing her 1st grade holiday party so we are going to make these as a special treat.

    I’m going to have to remember to store them somewhere other than with our other ornaments. Those go in the attic and I have the feeling these would not survive our 90 summers.

    Reply
  44. Jennifer

    I made these and they were so fun – and they looked gorgeous! Thanks for the idea. :) They look so pretty on our tree this year, and my daughter loved doing the craft with me. We accidentally used one Rose Art crayon and wow, it makes a huge difference. Crayola is far superior!

    Reply
  45. Alice Johns

    I love the looks of these and I read through ALL of your mail from fans about these ornaments. I am going to get the supplies and get ready to do them on a very boring snowy day very soon. Thanks for this idea – I am very excited to try it. I had heard to put them in the oven on warm (no details) but the hair dryer is much more convenient.

    Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I’m not entirely certain, but I really think glass is best. In order to get the crayons hot enough to melt, you might end up melting the plastic ball too!

      Reply
    1. Jill Post author

      I never tried that so I’m really not sure. Do pastels have wax in them like crayons do? You need the wax for them to melt properly.

      Reply

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